News and press releases

  • Royal Mail
    10 March 2015
    Neuroscience reveals impact of mail on the brain
  •  Neuroscience techniques have revealed that mail activates the area of the brain responsible for long term memory encoding (LTME), more strongly than other media
  • The neuroscience research involved 163 participants – one of the largest media studies of its kind - and found that mail has an effect that means recall will be more readily triggered later on.  In particular, mail has a 32 per cent more powerful effect on long term memory encoding - one of the key metrics for advertising effectiveness - than email and 72 per cent higher than TV
  • When comparing to mail to other media, the neuroscience engagement measure was found to be 33 per cent higher than email and 60 per cent higher than television
  • The findings are part of Royal Mail MarketReach’s 18-month research programme, The Private Life of Mail, which brings together unprecedented insight into the role of mail in people’s homes, hearts and heads, plus the impact this has on advertisers’ ROI

Neuroscience techniques have revealed that mail activates the area of the brain responsible for long term memory encoding (LTME) more strongly than other media.

The neuroscience research involved 163 participants – one of the largest media studies of its kind - and found that mail has an effect that means recall will be more readily triggered later on.  In particular, mail has a 32 per cent more powerful effect on LTME than email, and 72 per cent higher than TV.  LTME is one of the key metrics for advertising effectiveness,

The Private Life of Mail research programme also found that consumers interact with mail and absorb its messages in a largely unconscious way.  This means it works on the brain’s ‘System 1’ – the faster, more intuitive mode of thought, which affects decision making.

When comparing to mail to other media, the neuroscience engagement measure was found to be 33 per cent higher than the email experience and 60 per cent higher than the television experience.

The findings are part of Royal Mail MarketReach’s 18-month research programme,  The Private Life of Mail, which brings together unprecedented insight into the role of mail in people’s homes, hearts and heads, plus the impact this has on advertisers’ ROI.  The full research report can be downloaded from www.mailmen.co.uk.

Marketing industry leaders recently joined forces with Royal Mail MarketReach for the ‘MAILMEN’ campaign to promote The Private Life of Mail and demonstrate that mail has a vital role to play in the today's digital world and continues to be a powerful weapon in the marketer’s armoury.  The campaign contains an advert featuring Karen Blackett OBE, CEO, MediaCom with the following line: “After 20 years planning TV I’ve discovered a new channel.”

A dedicated direct mail campaign, devised by Publicis Chemistry, has been created to promote the findings of the neuroscience study. The campaign targets around 8,000 marketers and agencies as well as industry bodies and influencers.

Jonathan Harman, Managing Director Royal Mail MarketReach,said: “By all measures, mail has a profound effect on the human brain.  It is effective regardless of demographic indicators and stated attitudes.  Mail clearly has a strong interaction with other media, which can be exploited to boost overall campaign effectiveness.”

Ends 

For further information, contact:

James Eadie on 020 7449 8254/ 07850 757271 or email james.r.eadie@royalmail.com